About 85% Problematic: The trouble with predicting 85 percent of cyber-attacks using input from human experts

26 Apr

MIT researchers recently unveiled a system that combines machine learning with input from users to ‘predict 85% of the attacks.’ Each day, the system winnows down millions of rows to a few hundred atypical data points and passes these points on to ‘human experts’ who then label the few hundred data points. The system then uses the labels to refine the algorithm.

At the first blush, using data from users in such a way to refine the algorithm seems like the right thing to do, even the obvious thing to do. And there exist a variety of systems that do precisely this. In the context of cyber data (and a broad category of similar such data), however, it may not be the right thing to do. There are two big reasons for that. A low false positive rate can be much more easily achieved if we do not care about the false negative rate. And there are good reasons to worry a lot about false negative rates in cyber data. And second, and perhaps more importantly, incorporating user input on complex tasks (or where data is insufficiently rich) reduces to the following: given a complex task with inadequate time, the users use cheap heuristics to label the data, and supervised aspect of the algorithm reduces to learning cheap heuristics that humans use.